Natividad, 60, is married, her children are grown and independent. Her business is raising corn, potatoes and onions.
She grows her crops in Punata, a rural, very picturesque area, covered with green vegetation and surrounded by all kinds of crops.
Natividad and her husband live in their own home next to their crops. They have three hectares of land. Their agricultural cycle is six months. They sell their crops in the same community, at wholesale and retail. Most of the work is manual labor, and she has a fumigating backpack, spades and shovels, and a plow which is pulled by a pair of oxen, which she also owns. The land has an irrigation system through shallow channels, and receives water once a week through the community’s dam.

The advantage of this work is she has extensive experience; the problem is starting the growing cycle. Her dream is to have machinery to help with the work; she would like to fertilize and remove the top layer of soil to start planting. With this loan she will buy corn seeds and cow manure, and pay for the cost of labor to begin the work. This is the second loan she has ever received from the institution.
For these reasons Natividad is applying for a loan to buy corn seeds and cow manure to start planting and generate income.

A loan of $1,450 helps to buy corn seeds and cow manure to start planting and generate income.